Theories of corporate responsibility
 
Pure Marketplace Ethics Libertarian Marketplace
(Shareholder
Theory )
Social Marketplace Ethics Shared Value Ethics Stakeholder Theory - Soft Progressive Corporate Social Responsibility Triple Bottom Line / Sustainability Stakeholder Theory - Hard
 
Theories of corporate responsibility distributed across tensions
 
Profit
versus
social and
environmental engagement
Individualism versus collectivism Independence versus belonging Dignity
versus compassion
Opportunity
versus
equality
Shareholder
versus
stakeholder
   

BUSINESS ETHICS TENSION:
PROFIT VERSUS SOCIAL/ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Marketplace
 

Profit is the organization's guiding responsibility; social and environmental concerns exist only inside the value of profit, and may or may not be pursued

(Social and environmental initiatives are pursued only if they contribute to profitability in a way comparable with the business's core operation. Within the social marketplace, the condition's satisfaction may be taken to lead to its requirement.)

Shared Value
 

Profit is the organization's guiding responsibility. Social and environmental concerns exist independently; they are pursued if and only if profitable, or profit neutral.

(Perceiving social/environmental initiatives as independently valuable may create profit opportunities.)

Social Responsibility
 

Profit and social/environmental welfare are both autonomously valuable. They are pursued independently, even when in conflict.

(Social and environmental initiatives may detract from profit, they may be profit neutral, they may add to profit. In the latter case, social/environmental initiatives are not pursued because they are profitable: that's only a secondary effect, not a primary intention.)

profit-v-society
 
  Debate point: Show that businesses valuing profit/marketplace success benefit society more than businesses valuing economic and social success independently. (Apple - S. Jobs - does more for society than TOMS Shoes. Walmart - pre M. Duke - does more for society than TOMS Shoes.)   Debate point: Show that businesses valuing economic and social success independently are more successful in the marketplace than those valuing marketplace success exclusively. (TOMS Shoes makes more money, proportionally, than Apple under S. Jobs.. TOMS Shoes makes more money, proportionally, than Walmart pre M. Duke.)